Tag Archives: evaluation

Pass, Fail, Practice

Oh the power of words.

“I’m sorry. You tried and you failed.”

How many times do our kids hear or read these damning, undermining words?

Every time they hand in a paper to be graded, every time they sit a test, every time they raise their hands to answer a question, they are leaving themselves open to either a direct or an implied pass or fail judgment.

Let’s change the culture in the class room.

Let’s make it absolutely clear that we are here to learn, that learning requires risk taking and risk takers are a lot more interested in practicing things, in getting better and better at them, and not so interested in passing or failing.

What would this look like in a classroom?

Teachers ask a lot of questions.

Scenario 1

Teacher asks a question, lots of hands go up.

Student A answers and the teacher says “Thanks John, that’s right.”

What happens here is that student A knows he has ‘passed’, as does everyone else. Everyone else can now stop thinking.

Scenario 2

Teacher asks a question, lots of hands go up.

Student B answers and the teacher says “No, Lizzy, that’s wrong. Does anyone have a different idea?”

What happens here is that Lizzy knows she has failed and has to deal with this and everyone else knows that failure is an option so the risks involved in answering just got higher unless you are sure you are right.

Scenario 3

Teacher asks a question, lots of hands go up.

Student C answers and the teacher says “Thanks Alan. Who else has an idea?”

No judgment. No closing down of thinking because no doors have been closed. No fear of being wrong. Thinking continues.

If the teacher asks a question and withholds judgment, either positive or negative, the thinking will continue and risk taking will continue. Learning has a much better chance of continuing too.

Students do a lot of writing and teachers read what they write.

Grade two have been working hard on spelling patterns. They have been exploring the ‘ph’ digraph and looking for words that contain it. In a writing passage one child spells elephant like this ‘ellephant’.

Scenario 1

The teacher draws a red line through the word, indicating it is incorrectly spelled. The child has failed.

Scenario 2

The teacher places a series of small check marks above the e, the second e, the ph, the a, the n and the t. The teacher circles the ll. The child knows she got six things right but needs to work on one thing. She needs more practice. it’s not a matter of right or wrong, of pass or fail.

Share some of the practices in your classroom that change the culture from a pass/fail culture to a culture of practice.

As my daughter said to me this morning “I never fail, I just practice a lot. Sometimes I didn’t know I was practicing until later!”

 

 

 

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Filed under Classroom practice, Language and literacy, Testing

Don’t Forget the Kids

I am reading a great deal of commentary about the negative impacts of high stakes testing on teachers, on principals and on the education system in general. What I don’t read as much about is the effect on children.

When I was a school principal in the USA I worked very hard to develop a school environment that was welcoming, positive and made children feel safe. Many of the kids in this Title 1 School lived precarious lives outside the school building. I wanted school to be a place where they wanted to be.

This was testing week and we were about half way in. I had put in all the procedures my district required in order to maintain a common, secure standard of testing throughout all the schools. One group of fifth graders was in a portable classroom outside. During the Social Studies test a child needed to go to the bathroom. The assistant accompanied the child, and when they arrived back the child banged loudly on the locked classroom door, startling some of the children still working inside.

At the end of the test the teacher was required to complete an ‘exceptions’ report, indicating anything untoward that might have happened during the test. She mentioned this incident and reminded the children of the procedure should another child need to leave the room during testing. She then told the class (rather foolishly) that there was always a possibility they may have to repeat the test.

The Guidance Counselor and I were called urgently to the classroom a short time later. When I entered the room I was horrified by what I found. The teacher was seated on the floor physically restraining an hysterical child, another was repeatedly banging her head against the wall, a third was pulling hair from her head and many were crying . All this because they may have to take a test again.

The hidden levels of stress and fear that this testing regime had engendered in our children was made painfully obvious to me. I knew this had nothing to do with how my school was administering the tests. In comparison with other schools in the district we remained relatively relaxed about the testing period. I didn’t post monitors at desks in every hallway, I didn’t put signs outside the school asking motorists not to use their horns because “Testing is in progress”.

All educators understand that the entire enterprise is here for the benefit of our children. As we find ourselves caught up in these arguments about accountability and evaluation let us not neglect consideration of impacts this is having on them.

 

 

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Filed under Thinking